Medical assistant vs nurse

whats the difference between a medical assistant and a nurse? Nurses give needles, take out blood, take vitals and assist in lab work, what do medical assistants do?

3 answers

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ANSWER #1 of 3

Hope this helps: http://dannir.tblog.com/

http://www.pro-rh.com/nurse-jobs/61418.htm

http://www.sanford-brown.edu/campus/64/programs.asp?map=5

http://www.nurse.com/resources/category.cfm?cat=GRANTS

Education:

Registered nurses (RN) in the U.S. generally receive their basic preparation through one of four avenues:

Diploma in Nursing
Associate of Science in Nursing
Bachelor of Science in Nursing
Master of Science in Nursing

An academic course of study at any level typically includes such topics as anatomy and physiology, pharmacology and medication administration, psychology, ethics, nursing theory and legal issues. Additionally, extensive clinical training in nursing practice is required.

All U.S. states and territories require graduation from an accredited nursing program and successful completion of the NCLEX-RN to obtain state licensure as an RN.


ANSWER #2 of 3

Medical Assistant is a nothing job compared to nursing, trust me. MA's often have only a few weeks of training. There are NO jobs for them in hospitals; only in doctor's offices doing menial work. RN? The world is your oyster. Go for it. It's worth it.

Veterinary nurse

ANSWER #3 of 3

If you decide to become a registered nurse, there are several paths you can take:

• Study for an associate’s degree at a community college; typically two-three years;
• Pursue a bachelor’s degree at a four-year college or university; about four years, depending on your educational background;
• Go for a diploma through a hospital-based program, generally three years.

Experts say community colleges are a smart choice for workers seeking a fast-track into a career, whether it’s IT, nursing or otherwise.

dental assistants

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