Essay help!

I need help writing an essay. I suck at them and yet, we always have them. Yourd think iek after 5 of them, I’d be great at them-welp nope im not.

So anyway. Im doing an essay and the theme is political systems. The historical cont. Says:

 Several empires and nations throughtout global history have been ruled by strong laeders who have followed policies.

The task says:

  -define absolutism and identify the characteristics of absolutist rule.
  -select a nation or empire you have stufied that was ruled according to the pricncipes of absolutism
  -identify the specific characteristics of abslutist gov that existed in the nation or empire.
  -describe he major pos/neg eggect that absolutism had on this empire or nation.

Now I was gna write abuot russia(peter the great) but I cant. Its to hard and hes suppabsly the easiest one that we learned. I need major help. I don’t know what to do. Pelase help somehow

Answer #1

Ok, I found a list of rulers

Monarchs often depicted as absolute rulers include Louis XIII and Louis XIV of France, Ivan III, Ivan I’ve and Peter the Great of Russia, Leopold I of Austria, Frederick III of Denmark, Charles XI and Charles XII of Sweden, and Frederick the Great of Prussia.

What exactly are you having a problem with?

Here’s wikipedia’s take on it (please dont copy this, your teacher will find out), this is just to give you an idea of what sort of things to talk about, and how to lay it out…

Part 1: Absolutism is a historiographical term used to describe a form of monarchical power that is unrestrained by any other institutions, such as churches, legislatures, or social elites. Absolutism is typically used in conjunction with some European monarchs during the transition from feudalism to capitalism, and monarchs described as “absolute” can especially be found in the 17th century through the 19th century. Absolutism is characterized by the ending of feudal partitioning, consolidation of power with the monarch, rise of state power, unification of the state laws, and a decrease in the influence of nobility. Absolute monarchs are also associated with the rise of professional standing armies, professional bureaucracies, the codification of state laws, and the rise of ideologies that justify the absolutist monarchy. Absolutist monarchs typically were considered to have the divine right of kings as a cornerstone of the philosophy that justified their power. bsolute monarchs spent considerable sums on extravagant houses for themselves and their nobles. In an absolutist state, monarchs often required nobles to live in the royal palace, while state officials ruled the noble lands in their absence. This was designed to reduce the effective power of the nobility by causing nobles to become reliant upon the largesses of the monarch for their livelihoods.

Part 2: Peter the Great of Russia is often portrayed by historians as an example of an absolute ruler. He ruled Russia and later the Russian Empire from 7 May 1682 until his death, jointly ruling before 1696 with his weak and sickly half-brother, Ivan V. Peter the Great carried out a policy of modernization and expansion that transformed the Tsardom of Russia into the 3-billion acre Russian Empire, a major European power. Peter implemented sweeping reforms aimed at modernizing Russia. Heavily influenced by his advisors from Western Europe, Peter reorganized the Russian army along modern lines and dreamed of making Russia a maritime power. He faced much opposition to these policies at home, but brutally suppressed any and all rebellions against his authority, the rebelling of streltsy, Bashkirs, Astrakhan and including the greatest civil uprising of his reign, the Bulavin Rebellion. Further, Peter implemented social modernization in an absolute manner by requiring courtiers, state officials, and the military to shave their beards and adopt modern clothing styles. To improve his nation’s position on the seas, Peter sought to gain more maritime outlets. His only outlet at the time was the White Sea at Arkhangelsk. The Baltic Sea was at the time controlled by Sweden in the north, while the Black Sea was controlled by the Ottoman Empire in the south. Peter attempted to acquire control of the Black Sea, but to do so he would have to expel the Tatars from the surrounding areas. He was forced, as part of an agreement with Poland, which ceded Kiev to Russia, to wage war against the Crimean Khan and against the Khan’s overlord, the Ottoman Sultan. Peter’s primary objective became the capture of the Ottoman fortress of Azov, near the Don River. In the summer of 1695 Peter organized the Azov campaigns in order to take the fortress, but his attempts ended in failure. Peter returned to Moscow in November of that year, and promptly began building a large navy. He launched about thirty ships against the Ottomans in 1696, capturing Azov in July of that year. On 12 September 1698, Peter officially founded the first Russian Navy base, Taganrog. Peter knew that Russia could not face the Ottoman Empire alone. In 1697, he traveled incognito to Europe on an 18-month journey with a large Russian delegation–the so-called “Grand Embassy”—to seek the aid of the European monarchs.[8] Peter’s hopes were dashed; France was a traditional ally of the Ottoman Sultan, and Austria was eager to maintain peace in the east whilst conducting its own wars in the west. Peter, furthermore, had chosen the most inopportune moment; the Europeans at the time were more concerned about who would succeed the childless Spanish King Charles II than about fighting the Ottoman Sultan. The “Grand Embassy”, although failing to complete the mission of creating an anti-Ottoman alliance, still continued to travel across Europe. Peter’s visits to the West impressed upon him the notion that European customs were in several respects superior to Russian traditions. He commanded all of his courtiers and officials to cut off their long beards—causing his Boyars, who were very fond of their beards, great upset[13]—and wear European clothing. Boyars who sought to retain their beards were required to pay an annual beard tax of one hundred rubles. He also sought to end arranged marriages, which were the norm among the Russian nobility, because he thought such a practice was not only barbaric but also led to domestic violence since the partners usually resented each other in this forced union.[14] In 1699, Peter also changed the celebration of new year from 1 September to 1 January. Traditionally, the years were reckoned from the purported creation of the World, but after Peter’s reforms, they were to be counted from the birth of Christ.[citation needed] Thus, in the year 7207 of the old Russian calendar, Peter proclaimed that the Julian Calendar was in effect and the year was 1700. Peter I’s last years were marked by further reform in Russia. On 22 October 1721, soon after peace was made with Sweden, he was acclaimed Emperor of All Russia. Some proposed that he take the title Emperor of the East, but he refused. Gavrila Golovkin, the State Chancellor, was the first to add “the Great, Father of His Country, Emperor of All the Russias” to Peter’s traditional title Tsar following a speech by the archbishop of Pskov in 1721. Peter’s imperial title was recognized by Augustus II of Poland, Frederick William I of Prussia and Frederick I of Sweden, but not by the other European monarchs. In the minds of many, the word emperor connoted superiority or pre-eminence over “mere” kings. Several rulers feared that Peter would claim authority over them, just as the Holy Roman Emperor had once claimed suzerainty over all Christian nations. During Peter’s reign the Russian Orthodox Church was reformed. The traditional leader of the Church was the Patriarch of Moscow. In 1700, when the office fell vacant, Peter had refused to name a replacement, allowing the Patriarch’s Coadjutor (or deputy) to discharge the duties of the office. Twenty-one years later, in 1721, Peter followed the advice of Feofan Prokopovich and erected the Holy Synod, a council of ten clergymen, to take the place of the Patriarch and Coadjutor. Peter also implemented a law which stipulated that no Russian man could join a monastery before the age of 50. He felt that too many able Russian men were being wasted away by clerical work when they could be joining his new and improved army.[18] And in 18th century Russia, few people (men and women) lived to over a half century, therefore very few men became monks during Peter’s reign, much to the dismay of the Russian Church. In 1722, Peter created a new order of precedence, known as the Table of Ranks. Formerly, precedence had been determined by birth. In order to deprive the Boyars of their high positions, Peter directed that precedence should be determined by merit and service to the Emperor. The Table of Ranks continued to remain in effect until the Russian monarchy was overthrown in 1917. In addition, Peter decided that all of the children of the nobility should have some early education, especially in the areas of sciences. Therefore, on 28 February 1714, he introduced the decree on compulsory education which dictated that all Russian children of the nobility, of government clerks and even lesser ranked officials between the ages of 10 and 15 must learn basic mathematics and geometry and that they should be tested on it at the end of their studies. Peter also introduced new taxes to fund improvements in Saint Petersburg. He abolished the land tax and household tax, and replaced them with a capitation. The taxes on land on households were payable only by individuals who owned property or maintained families; the new head taxes, however, were payable by serfs and paupers. In 1724, Peter had his second wife, Catherine, crowned as Empress, although he remained Russia’s actual ruler. All of Peter’s male children had died—the eldest son, Alexei, had been tortured and killed on Peter’s orders in 1718 because he had disobeyed his father and opposed official policies. At the same time, Alexei’s mother Eudoxia had also been punished; she was dragged from her home and tried on false charges of adultery. A similar fate befell Peter’s beautiful mistress, Anna Mons, in 1704. In 1725, construction of Peterhof, a palace near Saint Petersburg, was completed. Peterhof (Dutch for “Peter’s Court”) was a grand residence, becoming known as the “Russian Versailles”.

ok I cant be bothered to read all of that, but take what you need from it (remember not to copy and paste, you need to get this stuff from your text book or wherever and cite sources), and make the third part about the pros/cons.

Part 4: conclude: sum up, add an interesting thing, and you’re done This really isnt that complicated…

Answer #2

Just give yourself a structure to write to, have an introduction introducing the essay and each point you will be explaining about. Then for each of the things you have to write about give it a subheading then a couple of paragraphs, finally round it off with a conclusion and basically say what you think is the most important factor and what you think is the most influential factor and WHY! You will need to explain why on essays its very important to do that, but as long as you have a structured plan and follow it you should be fine writing the essay :)

Answer #3

First of all look through good essays examples. Some people might already expressed your point. For this purpose I use goo.gl/YHWnO

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