Can i substitute anything for shortening?

I have a recipe that calls for shortening, but I want to make it healthier. Are there any healthy substitutions for shortening when you are baking?
Thanks!

10 answers

Recent Questions Food & Dining


ANSWER #1 of 10

In general, you can substitute Crisco® Shortening for butter or margarine in equal amounts. Crisco® Shortening gives you higher, lighter-textured baked goods. Recipes, such as candies and fudge, where butter or margarine is heated/melted and sugar is added/dissolved. Crisco® Shortening doesn't contain water,


ANSWER #2 of 10

lard is a good substitute but it's terrible for you but tastes great haha

butter also works i believe

Soybean oil substitute?

ANSWER #3 of 10

For each cup of shortening, substitute two sticks of polyunsaturated margarine.

Margarine is often fat-free or at least reduced fat, where shortening is a solid white fat made from hydrogenated vegetable oil.


ANSWER #4 of 10

Hey, half butter and the other half with blended into powder flax seed is great. I takes three times the flax to equal butter or shortening, but it is so much better for you. Cookies are twice as tall, and my boys don't like it, but that is great, that much more for me!



ANSWER #5 of 10

What about in a lipgloss recipe???


ANSWER #6 of 10

But what about when you are making pastry? I don't think the applesauce would work. Other suggestions?



ANSWER #7 of 10

It has been found that margarine is not natural therefore the body has troubles with it either in digestion or just not knowing what to do with it so it can come in out your pores or just travel in its original smeary form through your vessels. Please stay away from unnatural substances just because they say low cholesterol you can use applesauce or plain yogurt. depends on the recipe you can also use flax seed ground.


ANSWER #8 of 10

Traditionally, the word shortening referred to any solid fat, including butter, lard, and suet. But nowadays, when you see the word shortening in a recipe, it is referring to a solid fat made from vegetable oil. Hydrogenating the oil, that is, adding hydrogen gas to it at a high temperature and pressure, is what transforms it from a liquid at room temperature to a solid. Vegetable shortening is flavorless.
If your recipe calls for shortening to grease the griddle, of course you can use any fat you like, or you can be resolutely traditional and omit the fat. If it is an ingredient, vegetable oil, butter, or margarine would serve as a substitute. STICK margarine instead of tub margarine...tub margarine is useless for baking. Although, if you do choose MARGARINE instead of butter, note that margarine is only ONE chemical process away from PLASTIC! If you don't mind that, happy baking, otherwise, one of the others may be a better choice for you.



ANSWER #9 of 10

Use coconut oil.


ANSWER #10 of 10

Traditionally, the word shortening referred to any solid fat, including butter, lard, and suet. But nowadays, when you see the word shortening in a recipe, it is referring to a solid fat made from vegetable oil. Hydrogenating the oil, that is, adding hydrogen gas to it at a high temperature and pressure, is what transforms it from a liquid at room temperature to a solid. Vegetable shortening is flavorless.
If your recipe calls for shortening to grease the griddle, of course you can use any fat you like, or you can be resolutely traditional and omit the fat. If it is an ingredient, vegetable oil, butter, or margarine would serve as a substitute. STICK margarine instead of tub margarine...tub margarine is useless for baking. Although, if you do choose MARGARINE instead of butter, note that margarine is only ONE chemical process away from PLASTIC! If you don't mind that, happy baking, otherwise, one of the others may be a better choice for you.


Add your answer to this list